Beer 6 Awesome Beers from Around the World

6 Awesome Beers from Around the World

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What beer styles come from some of the coolest places around the globe? From India’s delicious lagers to New Zealand’s famous pale ales, these beers are worth tasting.Beer has become a worldwide favourite beverage. These days, you’ll see even grocery stores selling craft beers alongside their bottled water or soda counterparts. Craft beers tend to offer subtle flavours and unique ingredients, making them extremely enjoyable. The range of flavour profiles offered by beer is nearly endless.

Today, we’re going to take a look at six awesome beers from around the world. Some of them are classics, but some are newer and exciting too. Let’s get started!

Dogfish Head 60 Minute IPA – U.S.A.                                                                                              Awesome Beers from Around the World.

The story behind this beer begins in 1995 when brewer Sam Calagione was looking for an American-style hoppy ale that he could brew on his home system. He wanted something light enough to drink with food without overwhelming it, so he settled on using Cascade hops.

After trying several recipes, including one that used Cascade hops exclusively, he landed upon a recipe that would be ideal as a 60-minute IPA. This time, however, he decided to use Chinook hops instead of Cascade, which created the perfect balance between bitterness and aroma.

Harbin Bao’er Imperial Red Lager – China

Bao’er means “red dragon” in Chinese, and this red lager comes from the city of Harbin, located in northern China. It’s made by Kirin Brewery Company Limited (KBCL), which also makes other popular beer brands like Tsingtao.

This beer has been produced since 1992, and the name translates directly to mean “big emperor.” The brewery claims that the original brewers were inspired by the fact that the local people enjoyed drinking Harbin’s famous white lager while they gathered every year to watch the Winter Olympic Games. They thought that if they added a bit more colour, they might sell more of their products. After all, red is often associated with good things in China.

Westmalle Tripel – Belgium

Westmalle is a town in the Belgian province of Antwerp. It’s known for its large production breweries, and the most famous one is the brand Westmalle Trappist monastery.

This particular beer was brewed in 2006 to celebrate the 400th anniversary of the founding of Westmalle Abbey. As part of the festivities, the monks brewed a special beer called Tripel Karmeliet. But what makes this beer so special is that it contains no alcohol whatsoever. Instead, it consists entirely of spices such as coriander seed and orange peel.

Pliny the Elder

Pliny the Elder is the strongest imperial stout available today. Created in 2000, this beer weighs in at 10.5% ABV. It’s got a rich chocolate taste and bitter finish, and it’s considered one of the best examples of modern brewing techniques.

Russian River Brewing Co. partnered up with Pliny the Younger, a company that specializes in producing barrel-aged beers, and asked them to create a beer based on the original Pliny the Elder. But rather than simply copy the style, the team took inspiration from earlier versions of Pliny the Elder. To do this, they looked back at how the beer tasted before it was aged in oak barrels.

Grolsch Golden Strong Ale – Netherlands

Grolsch is not only loved throughout the Netherlands but also internationally. Known for its distinctive tulip shape, this amber beer offers a full body thanks to generous quantities of caramel malts. There is also a distinct citrus note that blends perfectly with the sweet maltiness.

Guinness Extra Stout – Ireland

Guinness is a stout-style beer created in 1759 by Arthur Guinness. Today, this is usually brewed with roasted barley rather than raw. They have taken things a step further by adding coffee beans for extra depth. Many consider this beer to be the best stout because of its rich mahogany colour and full body. This beer has the taste of chocolate-covered coffee beans thanks to the addition of roast barley. However, if you prefer your stouts lighter, then try a porter which tends to be less sweet and more balanced.

The Bottom Line

We hope our list gave you some ideas about where to start when trying to choose which beer to drink next. You may want to spend time researching different styles and finding out why each one appeals to you. That way, you can find something that suits your tastes and preferences. And if there are any local brews near you, we recommend heading down to the nearest store and giving them a try!

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